Rates Look Like They’re Headed Down.  Is It Time To Refi Your Mortgage?

Rates Look Like They’re Headed Down. Is It Time To Refi Your Mortgage?

You may have heard the term “refinance” many times over the years, but what does it mean, exactly? Whenever you refinance your mortgage, you’re completely scrapping your existing loan and replacing it with a new mortgage, which may include a new interest rate, a new loan term (the length of your loan), as well as an adjustment to the total amount borrowed.

But when, exactly, does refinancing make sense for you? There’s no simple answer to this question, explains Liz Miller, CFA & CFP, President of Summit Place Financial. When asking yourself if you should refinance, Keith Gumbinger, Vice President of HSH.com says to first consider what goal you’re trying to achieve. People often refinance in order to get a lower rate and monthly payment (called “rate-and-term” refinance), or to extract equity from their home (called a “cash-out” refinance).

Here’s a look at both:

Rate-And-Term Refinance

If you got your mortgage at a time when mortgage rates were a lot higher, it’s natural to consider refinancing when you see rates coming down, Miller says. Refinancing to lower your interest rate can certainly reduce your monthly payments, but you can’t always assume it will save you money long-term. “While the interest rate is of course important, there are costs for obtaining a new mortgage, and then there is a working future time frame over which those costs must be recovered. It really doesn’t make sense to refinance from a 4.5% rate to a 4% rate, and pay $3,000 to do so, saving just $75 per month, and then sell your home after 2 years. You wouldn’t even recover your costs, let alone save any money,” says Gumbinger. But, if you plan to keep your home for another 20 years, or if you’re refinancing to a much lower rate than you currently have, then this can be a great option for saving money.

Cash-Out Refinance

A cash-out refinance involves increasing the amount you borrow and pulling out some of the equity (or value) you’ve accrued in your home. “A mortgage is always based on the value of the home, so if your home has really grown in value since you bought it, you can get it reappraised at a higher value, then you can get a larger mortgage so that you can take some of that value out of the home.” Miller explains. Because you’re taking a loan out for more than you owe, you can spend the difference on other financial needs. Note: Under the new tax law, for the loan to qualify for the deduction in mortgage interest you need to spend the proceeds on improvements related to the home rather than, say college tuition or consolidating credit card debt.

So, What Kind Of Loan Do You Need?

You may have previously considered both fixed-rate mortgages (FRMs), and adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) For the vast majority of borrowers, it’s hard to beat the stability and simplicity of a fixed-rate mortgage. FRMs will maintain the same interest rate for the duration of the mortgage, while ARMs begin with a fixed rate for a specified amount of time (a rate that tends to be enticingly lower than the ones you might find on a FRM). But when the fixed interval of an ARM expires, your rate will be adjusted — perhaps increased — and this uncertainty is what make ARMs riskier. You have no way of safely knowing what your rate will be years down the road.

How Can You Get A Good Deal?

“If you’re looking at refinancing a mortgage, your first call should be to your current mortgage provider,” says Miller. Sometimes if you got your last mortgage recently, working with your current lender can alleviate the need for some paperwork. You’ll also want to shop around — credit unions and local banks are often active participants in this market.

“Be prepared with your list of questions to really make sure you know all the ins, outs, and costs you face when you’re going to be working on that mortgage, Miller advises. In other words, ask questions of all the prospective lenders you’re considering, and if something sounds too good to be true, ask for clarification or ask to get it in writing.

“Yes, shopping can take time and can be a bit of a pain.” Gumbinger acknowledges. “However, it’s worth the investment of time to understand: what you need, who you are as a borrower, and what the market has to offer you — so that you can know a bad deal from an average deal from a great deal.”

With Molly Povich

Articles
Is A Secure Credit Card Right For You?
Is A Secure Credit Card Right For You?

If you’re looking to open a credit card but either a) don’t have a credit history to speak of or b) have a credit score you aren’...

Read More

Getting A Degree?
Getting A Degree?

Is that associate’s degree worth it? A new study from The National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE) and Ohio State Univer...

Read More

How Many Credit Cards Should I Have?
How Many Credit Cards Should I Have?

While there’s no one definitive answer to the question of how many credit cards one “should” have, the rule of thumb is to have n...

Read More

Good and Bad
Good and Bad

It can be tempting to consider all debt as a negative, but that’s just not the case. There is “good” debt and “bad” debt. Seems a...

Read More

More Mortgages
More Mortgages

We always advise you to shop around for the best value, no matter the purchase. Buying a car? Shop around. Looking to change heal...

Read More

How To Consolidate Your Debt
How To Consolidate Your Debt

Having multiple sources of debt can make you feel like you’re being pulled in several different directions at once, and can take ...

Read More

Understanding The Difference Between Mortgage Prequalification And Preapproval
Understanding The Difference Between Mortgage Prequalification And Preapproval

So, you want to buy a home. Exciting! But as you may also be aware the mortgage process can be convoluted and confusing. Try to g...

Read More

Smart Car
Smart Car

According to the Federal Reserve, the three biggest debts for the average American are mortgages, student loans and auto loans. A...

Read More

Protect Your House
Protect Your House

Recently, more than 800 million mortgage-related files were leaked by title insurance company First American Financial Corporatio...

Read More

Website Terms of Service

Please read these "Website Terms of Service" carefully before using SavvyMoney Checkup ("site", "website"). Accessing this site, or making this site available to any third party, indicates that you have read and accept these terms.

  1. Materials. Materials in this site are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. Text, graphics, databases, HTML code, and other intellectual property are protected by US and International Copyright Laws, and may not be copied, reprinted, published, reengineered, translated, hosted, or otherwise distributed by any means without explicit permission.
  2. Links to Third-Party Sites. Linked, third-party sites from website are not under the control of the Licensor. The Licensor is not responsible for the contents of any linked site or any link contained in a linked site, or any changes or updates to such sites.
  3. Confidentiality of Codes, Passwords and Information. Licensee agrees to treat as strictly private and confidential any username, password, user ID, and all information to which you have access through password-protected areas of website.
  4. Maintenance. Licensor shall provide Licensee any new, corrected or enhanced version of the site as it becomes available. Such enhancement shall include all modifications to the site which increase the speed, efficiency or ease of use of the site, or add additional capabilities or functionality to the site, but shall not include any substantially new or rewritten version of the site.
  5. Limitation of Liability. Licensor shall not be responsible for, and shall not pay, any amount of incidental, consequential, or other indirect damages, whether based on lost revenue or otherwise, regardless of whether Licensor was advised of the possibility of such losses in advance. In no event shall Licensor's liability exceed the amount of license fees paid by Licensee, regardless of whether Licensee's claim is based on contract, tort, strict liability, product liability or otherwise.